5 Simple Tips To Take Better Photos

LIFESTYLE  |  April 10, 2017
  • 1. Take note of the lighting
    1 / 5 1. Take note of the lighting

    Photo: Alexander Dummer/ www.pexels.com

    Before taking a photo, position yourself in a way that the light will flatter the image. If you’re taking a group photo, the light should come from the front. If you’re taking a portrait, the light should come from either the top or sides. And if you’re looking for a more ghostly effect, the light should come from below.

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  • 2. Use the flash sparingly
    2 / 5 2. Use the flash sparingly

    Photo: plBrYK/ www.pixabay.com

    The flash function should only be used in specific situations. Besides low-light situations, it can be used for freeze motion in photos too. This is when you want to take a photo of a fast-moving object.

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  • 3. Try special effects
    3 / 5 3. Try special effects

    Photo: unsplash.com/ www.pexels.com

    If you want to make your photos look more artistic, try these simple tricks. During slow shutter speed moments, try zooming in and out for a cool blur-effect photo. Alternatively, wrap coloured cellophane paper to around your lens to give your photos an instant filter.

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  • 4. Zoom in when it comes to food
    4 / 5 4. Zoom in when it comes to food

    Photo: unsplash.com/ www.pexels.com

    Want to capture that delicious meal in front of you? Avoid wide-angle shots when taking photos of your food. Instead, use the zoom function to capture the details of the yummy goodness on your plate.

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  • 5. It’s all about proportion for landscape shots
    5 / 5 5. It’s all about proportion for landscape shots

    Photo: unsplash.com/ www.pexels.com

    If you’re trying to get the perfect landscape shot, remember this guide: show 60 per cent land, 30 per cent skies or water, and 10 per cent subject or element. If you want the subject to stand out from the background, use the rule of thirds. Basically, you mentally divide the frame equally using two horizontal and two vertical lines, and the subject should be near the points where the lines intersect.

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