6 Myths About Running to Stop Believing Now

by Zarelda Marie Goh
FITNESS  |  October 22, 2017
  • The truth about running
    1 / 7 The truth about running

    Before I started training for this year’s Los Angeles Marathon (which I successfully completed), I was a little nervous, especially since I had taken a long break from running.

    My running coach, Andrew Cheong of SSTAR.fitness, helped to allay my fears. Here, he debunks six common running myths. Read on to see if these false truths are stopping you from running.

    Photo: lzflzf/123rf.com

     

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  • Myth 1: Running is only for the young and fit
    2 / 7 Myth 1: Running is only for the young and fit

    Andrew says, “Young is a state of mind and fitness is something everyone of all ages can achieve. In fact, many who run feel younger as they get fitter. Unlike other sports where youth has an advantage, such as gymnastics and swimming, running is a sport that anyone can do. As we age, our cardiovascular system, muscles and bones will not perform as well as someone younger. But age should not be a barrier to running.”

    Photo: lzflzf/123rf.com

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  • Myth 2: Running is bad for the knees
    3 / 7 Myth 2: Running is bad for the knees

    Andrew says, “Too much running is bad for the knees. That said, too much of anything is probably bad. Studies have shown that our bones and ligaments actually respond positively to load bearing exercise – like running – by getting stronger and denser. If you are not predisposed to osteoarthritis, and have normal knees and are of healthy weight, then running will not affect your knees.”

    Photo: Kamil Macniak/123rf.com

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  • Myth 3: You have to run every single day to see results
    4 / 7 Myth 3: You have to run every single day to see results

    Andrew says, “Rest is part of your training, so rest days are essential. Novices to intermediate runners will get optimum results if they run three times or week or on alternate days. Elite runners may train every day, or even twice a day on some days. It all depends on how much rest you need based on your work load.”

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  • Myth 4: Running barefoot is the best way to run
    5 / 7 Myth 4: Running barefoot is the best way to run

    Andrew says, “Barefoot running has been popularised by the book Born to Run, but it is not something for everybody. Those who have tried it report that they have better running gait, and even fewer injuries but mainstream runners prefer the comfort and protection that a good pair of running shoe provides. If you still want to try barefoot running, it’s best to start slowly and build up the mileage and intensity.”

    Photo: rtypez/123rf.com

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  • Myth 5: You must always stretch before you run
    6 / 7 Myth 5: You must always stretch before you run

    Andrew says, There are various types of stretching, broadly divided into static and dynamic stretching. Before a run, it’s best to be warmed up, and dynamic stretching is recommended as part of a warm-up routine. However for slower runs, a simple jog could be enough to warm up and sometimes skipping the stretching is okay.”

    (Also Read: 6 Stretches You Must Do Before & After a Run)

    Photo: magiceyes/123rf.com

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  • Myth 6: Runners don’t need to build strength
    7 / 7 Myth 6: Runners don’t need to build strength

    Andrew says, “Like any sport, a certain level of strength is beneficial. Strength training is an essential part of a runner’s training. Strong muscles help maintain good posture when running and reduce the risk of injury. Did you know the impact to your leg could be up to three times your bodyweight when you run? Running is a one-legged activity – you land one leg at a time – so it’s best to have strong muscles to keep yourself balanced.”

    For inspiration on strengthening exercises that you can do easily at home, click here.

    Photo: lzflzf/123rf.com

    This article is brought to you by Skechers.

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